How Young Springboard Divers Can Deal With Failure

Springboard diving in San Diego is a popular sport with kids and parents alike because it promotes fun, confidence, and leadership skills. So what is the best way for kids to face failure in their athletic activities? First of all, Dive San Diego doesn’t view a diver’s inability to achieve a goal as a traditional failure. Whether a student diver hits his goals or falls short, it is a learning experience that will lay the tracks to success, and if it takes some a little longer to reach that destination, that’s okay. The best San Diego springboard diving coach offers lessons that are catered to each individual’s learning styles and special needs. The word “failure” has no meaning so long as the team supports itself, strives for improvement, and has fun while building valuable skills along the way. However, we are all human, and when kids don’t hit their mark the first or second time, they may feel less motivated or insecure. Here are some things to consider. Failure in Springboard Diving Has Early Roots Difficult to See Student and competition springboard divers have expectations: they imagine winning the meet, and they imagine successfully executing a difficult dive they practiced 100 times. When they don’t meet these expectations they can become very hard on themselves, lose confidence, and enter a slump that has direct consequences on performance. This is why Coach Marnie Young is widely celebrated for being the best San Diego springboard diving coach, let alone one of the best in the sport at a nationwide level. Her background in applied athletics and child psychology and development equips...

Springboard Diving San Diego Lessons: Drills and Why We do Them

Drills are a vital part of sports, and when you sign up with Coach Marnie Young and Dive San Diego you will be working with one of the best springboard diving coaches in the country.  An exceptional springboard diving coach is always cognizant of every aspect that matters in the development of a student diver regardless of their experience or age. When you take springboard diving San Diego lessons you will be introduced to a number of elements vital to the success of your progression in the sport, including diving drills. When examining the face of springboard diving, most coaches and students are unable to understand the importance of drills. Structured repetitive exercises conflict with the “ off the shelf” and “ready-to-go” philosophy that so many embrace in the sport of springboard diving. But our springboard diving lessons embrace drills because Coach Marnie understands that muscle memory and attention to detail can win meets and develop divers to the levels they aspire to reach. One of the biggest challenges that springboard diving coaches face is that teens and young divers in our current generation are only motivated by that which can be obtained quickly and with little effort.  But the fact of the matter is that springboard diving students who really want to excel in the sport must work hard to embark on that road, and drills that students typically face in springboard diving lessons offered by the top coaches will experience this, and improve greatly. The following are some drills that makeup the best part of springboard Diving San Diego lessons in the entire county: Kick Out Drills...

San Diego Springboard Diving Lessons: How to Overcome Mental Barriers in Competitions

If you are watching the 2014 Sochi Winter Olympics you will have likely heard the commentators talk about the importance of athletes overcoming mental barriers and relaxing during competition. Whether competing in the Olympics or participating with a springboard diving San Diego team, mental barriers will surface as they are natural obstacles athletes at all levels encounter in competitive sports. By knowing what some of these mental barriers are common to springboard diving, athletes and parents can be prepared to face them head-on in a healthy and constructive manner. And as such, the best San Diego springboard diving lessons will cover these mental bases. Performance Fears As athletes approach the diving board, there is a lot of pressure on their shoulders. All eyes are on them, waiting to examine their every move while all along the athlete is trying to ensure he is lined up correctly, has his breathing under control and is focusing on the moves and steps necessary for completing a successful dive. According to ‘Psychology Today’, performance fears in sports are common in athletes all over the country, as their effort to protect themselves from perceived threat or the expectation of threat that they make them lose sight as to why they are positioning themselves for the dive in the first place. The athlete will lose focus without even realizing it. When students are engaged in springboard diving lessons, good coaches are cognizant to complex topics such as this. Often these athletes become scared of both failing and succeeding. ‘Psychology Today’ states that, “the key to managing these performance anxieties is to disarm the fire alarms....

What we Learn in Springboard Diving Lessons: 6 Keys to Diving in the Zone

By Dr. Alan Goldberg You look for your score when it’s all over and can’t believe your eyes. Even though you’re surprised, you somehow knew this was going to be a great dive right from the moment that you climbed onto the board for your very first dive. All of your dives had that very special feel that seems to come around all too infrequently. Maybe it was the sense you had just before each dive of being in your own little world, aware of everything and everyone around you, yet strangely oblivious to it all. It was as if you had “concentration blinders” on and all that you could see or hear was what you were doing and nothing else. Maybe it was that calm, that confidence that seemed to settle over you just before the meet even began. Your old friend fear was nowhere to be found. Perhaps it was a strange combination of feeling both loose and excited at the same time that enveloped you just before you took off on that first dive. On the board you felt calm and focused. There was an easy strength and energy that seemed to flow through your muscles. Your takeoff felt strong and powerful. Dare you say perfect! You went up high over the board, your above board mechanics were strong clean. Your timing was exquisite, over and overagain. You ripped your entries. There was an almost eerie connection between your mind and body. It was as if you could simply mentally rehearse the dive before you went and, almost instantaneously, with your takeoff, you perfectly reproduced those...